Identity Automation Blog

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Eliminating or reducing the number of passwords in the enterprise remains a top focus of management and security professionals alike. While single sign-on technologies, such as password managers, identity federation, and operating system-based technologies, that reduce and simplify the number of passwords have been in use for years, the number of passwords and emerging technologies to address the problem has also increased.

Intruders Thrive on Complacency

In the first installment of our series on security and the CEO, we discussed the dangerous disconnect between the rosy view of security held by the C-suite and the much grimmer reality seen in the trenches of IT. Today, we’re going to talk about the consequences of executive overconfidence in your information security program.

In today’s digital world, information security has quickly become one of the foremost areas of concern for individuals and businesses alike. Particularly in the business realm, government regulations, such as the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), require close security auditing and penetration testing in order to ensure consumer, patient, and business data are handled securely (i.e. storage, retrieval, transmission, and authorized access).

Launching new IT initiatives is always a challenge, and the roll-out and adoption of a new identity and access management (IAM) program is no exception. While you understand how your IAM solution will better secure your organization and data and make getting work done easier, your co-workers don’t always look positively on change.

At the highest level, identity management systems are typically composed of three major elements: users, systems/applications, and policies. Policies define how the users interact with the different systems and applications.

The digital transformation of the last two decades has placed cybersecurity front and center on the CEO agenda. Customers now place vast quantities of personal information into the hands of businesses, with the expectation of a certain amount of privacy and confidentiality in exchange. The ability to meet this expectation is crucial in order for a business to retain customers and build its brand.

So, what does 2017 have in store for the security industry? While there’s no crystal ball that can tell us for sure, we’ve got our eye on a few key trends.

Entering a new year, we always take a look at what the latest in identity and access management  (IAM) and cybersecurity threats means for the security industry. This year, we specifically focused on answering three key questions:

As a marketing professional one of the most important jobs my team and I perform is building support and loyalty around our company’s brand. Building a brand the right way helps to create a strong community that believes strongly in our products, ultimately creating evangelists. Effective branding contributes to getting people fired up and ready to buy.

When we engage with a new IT team and ask how they are currently managing user identities and access, more often than not, they simply point to a single sign-on (SSO) portal. This inevitably prompts a clarifying discussion around the meaning of SSO.