Identity Automation Blog

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Multi factor Authentication (MFA) is an extremely hot topic among enterprises, education organizations, and consumers alike. Almost daily, we hear about a data breach being discovered in the news. Often, the response to such an intrusion is for the impacted users to change their passwords and enable some type of multi factor authentication on their accounts.

Now that your C-suite understands your company’s information security program, it’s time to move further into the educational phase.

As you evaluate and prioritize the risks your organization faces, identity and access management (IAM) should become a clearer and clearer priority. To help you educate your CEO on the need for increased investment in modern IAM solutions, here is some key IAM terminology that you can use as you work to transition your company to a more modern strategy.  

Upgrade now for new report templates, password alternatives for Chromebooks, and remote start-ups, logins, and shutdowns.

We are very excited to announce the latest releases of RapidIdentity 4.2 and RapidIdentity MFA 4.8 (formerly 2FA ONE) and want to share the details of the new capabilities available to those who choose to upgrade.

By now, we should all be aware of the inadequacies of passwords. Breach after breach, it's been made painfully clear that single-factor authentication is not enough. But when the traditional means of authentication are so clearly flawed, what’s the next step?

Generally speaking, the best practice is to step-up your security with either two-factor or multi-factor authentication. As these standards have quickly become essential parts of the information security toolkit, they've also become top-of-mind considerations for many IT and security pros.

Eliminating or reducing the number of passwords in the enterprise remains a top focus of management and security professionals alike. While single sign-on technologies, such as password managers, identity federation, and operating system-based technologies, that reduce and simplify the number of passwords have been in use for years, the number of passwords and emerging technologies to address the problem has also increased.

Intruders Thrive on Complacency

Compliance with the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI-DSS) alone does not ensure security against data breaches and stolen payment card records. Even the PCI-DSS website defines the standard’s priorities as helping:

I am excited to share our latest press release announcing that Identity Automation has acquired, 2FA, Inc., a cybersecurity company that specializes in multi-factor authentication and enterprise single sign-on (SSO).

Authentication has become an integral piece of the identity management solution set, largely driven by the need to better protect user credentials and privileged accounts. More and more, industries with a focus on strong compliance regulations are seeing guidelines put in place that require stronger authentication techniques in order to protect that data.

From the massive Target data breach in 2013 to the Wendy's, UC Berkeley, IRS, and U.S. Department of Justice breaches of 2015 and 2016, today's enterprise exists in a security minefield in which a single misstep could lead to a massive breach and public blowout. As IT departments shutter and make sure to shore up their perimeter security, unfortunately, many overlook the fact that it was actually legitimate user credentials that were used in most 2016 data breaches, with some 63% being the result of weak, default, or stolen passwords, according to the new Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR). These results drive home the point that passwords are the weakest link in the security chain and malicious intruders know it.

In the first installment in this blog series, we looked at the many trends in the business landscape today (digital transformation, a changing workforce, and the shift to cloud IT infrastructures, among others) that are driving the need for a more comprehensive and integrated IAM solution. In our second blog in this series, we will take a look at why evolving regulatory and threat landscapes, combined with shrinking IT budgets, have necessitated more robust, modern IAM solutions.